Monday, December 15, 2008

Rabbit Top Image

Rabbit Top Image
Unlike most of the cast in the books, who are based on stuffed animals owned by Christopher Robin Milne, the illustrations of Rabbit look more like a living animal than a stuffed one. This idea is also supported by Rabbit's own comment to Owl, "You and I have brains. The others have fluff." In Ernest H. Shepard's illustrations, Rabbit appears like a typical, long-eared rabbit, except that he walks on two legs and uses his front paws as hands. The top of his head reaches about to Pooh's nose; his ears, when pointed straight up, reach to just above Pooh's head.
While loyal to the friends he knows, Rabbit shows a certain reluctance to welcome newcomers, as evidenced by his initial negative reaction to the arrival of Kanga and Roo in the first book, and to Tigger in the second book. Nonetheless, he warms up to all of them in time.
Rabbit likes to take charge and come up with elaborate plans, such as the one to scare Kanga by hiding Roo, and the one to "unbounce" Tigger. He is also an organizer, as in the case of the Search for Small. As detailed as his plans are, they often miss certain key points, and thus go wrong in one way or another.
Rabbit tends to include Pooh and Piglet in particular in his plans, and he goes to Owl when there is "thinking to be done". He sees his relationship to Christopher Robin as being the one that Christopher depends on. Rabbit also has good relationships with the minor animals in the forest, who are usually referred to as his "friends-and-relations". Several are mentioned by name, including a wasp called Small, a beetle named Alexander Beetle, another member of the beetle family named Henry Rush, and three unspecified creatures called Smallest-of-All, Late, and Early. According to the illustrations of the book, his other friends-and-relations include other rabbits, a squirrel, a hedgehog, some mice, and insects. At one point, Rabbit estimates that he would need "seventeen pockets" if he were going to carry all his family about with him; whether that number refers just to his relatives or to the friends-and-relations as a group is unknown, if it had any basis at all.
Rabbit lives in house in the north central part of the Hundred Acre Wood, between the sandy pit where Roo plays and the area where his friends-and-relations live.
Rabbit appears in most Disney Winnie the Pooh cartoons.
Rabbit Wallpaper
As an addition to his character, he likes his garden and does whatever he can to protect it from other animals such as bugs and crows. He gets cross and grumpy when they try to steal his vegetables, especially carrots. In one episode, he even goes so far as to build a fortress around his garden, including a moat and booby traps. Tigger, Pooh and Piglet come to see him, and he tells them to go away and leave him alone. The trio leaves him to his gardening, at which point he realizes he forgot to add a door to his fortress, and he is stuck inside.
Traditionally, the Disney adaptation of Rabbit's fur is usually yellow, but on The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh his fur color is green.
In one episode of The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh he adopts a bluebird named Kessie that he rescued from a snowstorm.
The original voice of Rabbit in the Disney films was Junius Matthews. After his death, Will Ryan, and later Ken Sansom replaced him as the voice of Rabbit.
As of 2004, Rabbit now appears at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, FL and Disneyland in Anaheim, CA for meet and greets.
Rabbit was featured as one of the guests in House of Mouse.(Wikipedia)
Rabbit WallpaperRabbit Wallpaper

Rabbit in the GardenRabbit in the Garden

Winnie the Pooh Top Picture

Winnie the Pooh Top Picture
Winnie-the-Pooh, commonly shortened to Pooh Bear and once referred to as Edward Bear, is a fictional bear created by A. A. Milne. The character first appeared in book form in Winnie-the-Pooh (1926) and The House at Pooh Corner (1928). Milne also included several poems about Winnie-the-Pooh in the children’s poetry books When We Were Very Young and Now We Are Six. All four volumes were illustrated by E. H. Shepard.
The hyphens in the character's name were later dropped when The Walt Disney Company adapted the Pooh stories into a series of Winnie the Pooh featurettes that became one of the company's most successful franchises worldwide.
The Pooh stories have been translated into many languages, notably including Alexander Lenard's Latin translation, Winnie ille Pu, which was first published in 1958, and, in 1960, became the first foreign-language book to be featured on the New York Times Best Seller List, and is the only book in Latin ever to have been featured therein.
Winnie the Pooh Image
Milne named the character Winnie-the-Pooh after a teddy bear owned by his son, Christopher Robin Milne, who was the basis for the character Christopher Robin. His toys also lent their names to most of the other characters, except for Owl and Rabbit, who were probably based on real animals, and the Gopher character, who was added in the Disney version. Christopher Robin's toy bear is now on display at the Main Branch of the New York Public Library in New York.
Harry Colebourne and Winnie 1914
Christopher Milne had named his teddy after Winnipeg, a bear which he and his father often saw at London Zoo, and "Pooh", a swan they had met while on holiday. Winnipeg the Bear was purchased from a hunter for $20 by Canadian Lieutenant Harry Colebourn in White River, Ontario, Canada, while en-route to England during the First World War. He named the bear "Winnipeg" after his hometown in Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Winnie the Pooh Photo
"Winnie", as she became known, was surreptitiously brought to England with her owner, and gained unofficial recognition as a regimental mascot. Colebourn left Winnie at the London Zoo while he and his unit were in France; after the war she was officially donated to the zoo, as she had become a much loved attraction there. Among her many young fans was Christopher Milne, who named his own teddy bear "Winnie". Pooh the swan appears as a character in its own right in When We Were Very Young.
In the first chapter of Winnie-the-Pooh, Milne offers this explanation of why Winnie-the-Pooh is often called simply "Pooh": "But his arms were so stiff ... they stayed up straight in the air for more than a week, and whenever a fly came and settled on his nose he had to blow it off. And I think - but I am not sure - that that is why he is always called Pooh."
The home of the Milnes, Ashdown Forest in East Sussex, England, was the basis for the setting of the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. The name of the fictional "Hundred Acre Wood" is reminiscent of the Five Hundred Acre Wood, which lies just outside Ashdown Forest and includes some of the locations mentioned in the book, such as the Enchanted Place.
The origin of the Poohsticks game is at the footbridge across a tributary of the River Medway near Upper Hartfield, close to the Milne's home at Posingford Farm. It is traditional to play the game there using sticks gathered in nearby woodland. When the footbridge required replacement in recent times the engineer designed a new structure based closely on the drawings (by E H Shepherd) of the bridge in the original books, as the bridge did not originally appear as the artist drew it. There is an information board at the bridge which describes aspects of how to play the game.(Wikipedia)
Winnie the Pooh Top PictureWinnie the Pooh Top Picture

Winnie the Pooh and Friends PictureWinnie the Pooh and Friends Picture

My Father and His Dog...

Story from my friend:

"I have an animal dog, and my father is very dear to him. Because so unfortunately, he also makes a door for himself ..."




Morty and Ferdie Fieldmouse Picture

Morty and Ferdie Fieldmouse Picture
Morty and Ferdie Fieldmouse are Mickey Mouse's nephews in the fictional Mickey Mouse universe. They first appeared in Floyd Gottfredson's Mickey Mouse Sunday comic strip continuity titled Mickey's Nephews (1932). Since then they have appeared in lots of comic strips and comic book stories starring Mickey Mouse and Pluto.
In pre-World War II Mickey children's books (not comics) produced by the Disney studio, the nephews were usually called Morty and Monty rather than Morty and Ferdie. Very early books contain three or more nephews with various names, including Maisie and Marmaduke. Morty's name, short for Mortimer, is possibly in reference to the originally planned name for Mickey, Mortimer Mouse and Ferdie (sometimes misspelled "Ferdy") is short for "Ferdinand."
Morty and Ferdie Wallpaper
The twins' first film appearance was the 1934 Mickey Mouse cartoon titled Mickey's Steamroller. Aside from a difficult-to-spot cameo in 1938's Boat Builders, they didn't appear in animation again until Mickey's Christmas Carol (1983). Then they made a cameo appearance in a two part Mickey Mouse Works segment titled Around the World in Eighty Days, which was later reused for an episode of House of Mouse.
Morty and Ferdie's mother appears in their 1932 comics debut. In the English version of these strips, she is referred to only as "Mrs. Fieldmouse." In the Dutch translation of the strips, her name is given as Amalia Maus. In various English language references, this is typically Anglicized to Amelia Fieldmouse. The original strips do not make clear that Amelia is Mickey's sister (as drawn, she looks more like a maiden aunt), but the relationship has been clarified when she reappeared in more recent comics, where her name is now more commonly known as "Felicity Fieldmouse" (a designation, at least in part, by Egmont Publishing to distinguish her from Magica De Spell, as Magica is also commonly known as "Amelia" in European Disney comics). The name Felicity is also used in many of the reprints of the early appearances of the Twins. As a side note, Egmont also names Felicity's husband, the Twins' father, Frank, though he has yet to be specifically named or depicted in a published comic.
Ferdie disappeared from the Mickey Mouse comic strip in 1943 because Gottfredson thought the nephews were too much alike. He had plans to bring Ferdie back later as a bespeckled, intellectual, bookworm mouse with an Eton hat and coat with the explanation that he had been away at school. However, Gottfredson never got around to bringing Ferdie back and Morty remained in the strip alone. Morty was occasionally depicted with his best friend named Alvin and a sweetheart named Millie. Both were anthropomorphic dogs. Ferdie never vanished from comic book stories, however. In recent years, some of Morty and Ferdie's comic book appearances have portrayed them as football (soccer) players on the team Riverside Rovers. Their mother is depicted as a supportive "Soccer Mom." Morty & Ferdie are also occasionally pitted against their antagonists Melody, Minnie Mouse's niece and Pete's twin hellion nephews, Pierino & Pieretto.
Morty should not be confused with Micky Mouse's originally proposed name "Mortimer Mouse," or Mickey's ofttimes rival of the same name Mortimer Mouse, or Minnie's wealthy rancher Uncle Mortimer.(Wikipedia)
Morty and Ferdie Fieldmouse WallpaperMorty and Ferdie Fieldmouse Wallpaper

Huey, Dewey, and Louie Top Image

Huey, Dewey, and Louie
Huey, Dewey, and Louie Duck are a trio of ducks who appear in animated cartoons and comic books published by the Walt Disney Company. Identical triplets, the three are Donald Duck's nephews. Huey, Dewey, and Louie were created by Ted Osborne and Al Taliaferro, and first appeared in a newspaper comic strip on October 17, 1937. Their first animated appearance was in the theatrical short Donald's Nephews, released April 15, 1938.
On a few occasions, there is a fourth nephew that appears, slipping through by a mistake of the artist. He has been named "Phooey Duck" by Disney comic editor Bob Foster. One short Egmont-licensed Disney comic explained Phooey's sporadic appearances as a freak incident of nature.
Huey, Dewey, and Louie Image
Huey, Dewey, and Louie are the sons of Donald's sister; in Donald's Nephews, Donald's sister is named Dumbella, but in the comics, her full name is Della Thelma Duck. In the original theatrical shorts, they were originally sent to visit Donald for only one day; in the comics, the three were sent to stay with Donald on a temporary basis, until their father came back from the hospital (the boys ended up sending him there after a practical joke of putting firecrackers under his chair). In both the comics and animated shorts, the boys' parents were never heard from or referred to again after these instances, with the boys ending up permanently living with Donald, in keeping with Disney's usual elimination of characters' parents. All four of them live in the fictional city of Duckburg, in the fictional state of Calisota.
The boys are noted for having both identical appearances and personalities in most appearances, with the three sometimes shown as finishing each others' sentences as a running joke. In the theatrical shorts, Huey, Dewey, and Louie would often behave in a rambunctious manner, sometimes committing retaliation or revenge on their uncle Donald for something he did to them. In the comics, however, as developed by Al Taliaferro and Carl Barks, the boys usually are shown in a more well-behaved manner, usually helping their uncle Donald and great-uncle Scrooge McDuck in the adventure at hand. In the early Barks comics, the ducklings were still wild and unruly, but their character improved considerably due to their membership in the Junior Woodchucks and the good influence of their wise old great-grandmother Elvira Coot "Grandma" Duck.(Wikimedia)
Huey, Dewey, and Louie WallpaperHuey, Dewey, and Louie Wallpaper

Huey, Dewey, and Louie ImageHuey, Dewey, and Louie Image

Daisy Duck Best Photo

Daisy Duck Best Photo
Daisy Duck is one of Walt Disney's cartoon and comic book characters. She was created as a female counterpart and girlfriend to Donald Duck, and first appeared in the cartoon "Mr. Duck Steps Out" in 1940. Daisy has Donald's temper but has far greater control of it (although on rare occasions her temper can burst out and she can get into rages similar to Donald's), and tends to be more sophisticated than her boyfriend. She usually wears either no pants herself or a dress. She is mostly shown as showing a strong affinity towards Donald.
Daisy replaced (or, according to some sources, represents a later form of) a short-lived early love interest named Donna Duck, who first appeared in the cartoon "Don Donald" in 1937. In a short 1951 comic strip continuity, Donna returned, ret-conned into an unrelated Mexican girl duck who functioned as a rival for Donald's affections.
Daisy is the aunt of triplets April, May and June Duck, who serve as Huey, Dewey, and Louie's female counterparts. In some appearances, Daisy is presented as a close friend of Minnie Mouse.
Daisy & Donald Duck
The history of Daisy in animation can be traced to the appearance of her precursor Donna Duck in the cartoon short Don Donald (first released on January 9, 1937). The short was directed by Ben Sharpsteen. The plot had Donald courting Donna somewhere in Mexico. His efforts were frustrated and Donna leaves him alone and rides away in her unicycle by the finale.
The short is important for introducing a love interest for Donald. But one should note that Donna had little in common with Daisy other than both being female ducks and sharing a temper. Donna was more or less a female version of Donald both in design and voice. Her voice was provided by Clarence Nash and was a slightly higher version of that of Donald. Donna was not intended as a recurring character and the Donald shorts of the following three years featured no female companion for him.
Daisy Duck in her familiar name and design first appeared in Mr. Duck Steps Out (June 7, 1940). The short was directed by Jack King and scripted by Carl Barks. There Donald visits the house of his new love interest for their first known date .
Daisy Duck Picture
At first Daisy acts shy and has her back turned to her visitor. But Donald soon notices her tailfeathers taking the form of a hand and signaling for him to come closer. But their time alone is soon interrupted by Huey, Dewey, and Louie who have followed their uncle and clearly compete with him for the attention of Daisy. Uncle and nephews take turns dancing the jitterbug with her while trying to get rid of each other. In their final effort the three younger Ducks feed their uncle maize in the process of becoming popcorn. The process is completed within Donald himself who continues to move wildly around the house while maintaining the appearance of dancing. The short ends with an impressed Daisy showering her new lover with kisses.
The short stands out among other Donald shorts of the period for its use of modern music and surreal situations throughout. The idea of a permanent love interest of Donald was well established following it. But Daisy did not appear as regularly as Donald himself. Her next appearance in A Good Time for a Dime (May 9, 1941) features her as one of the temptations threatening to separate Donald from his money.
The short The Nifty Nineties (June 20, 1941). featured Mickey and Minnie Mouse in an 1890s setting. But Daisy made a cameo following Goofy and alongside Donald, Huey, Dewey and Louie. This was an indication Daisy was a permanent addition to the supporting cast of Donald. This short was directed by Riley Thompson.
However she would make no further animated appearances until Donald's Crime (June 29, 1945). The short featured Donald having arranged a date with Daisy at a nightclub but not having enough money to pay for it. He proceeds to take $1.35 from the piggy bank of his nephews. The crime of the title is theft and the rest of the short focused on Donald feeling guilt. His own imagination provided increasingly disturbing and nightmarish visions of the possible repercussions of his actions and resulted in Donald resolving to return the money.(Wikipedia)
Daisy Duck Best PhotoDaisy Duck Best Photo

Pluto Top Image

Pluto Top Image
Pluto (formerly known as Pluto the Pup) is an animated cartoon character made famous in a series of Disney short cartoons. He has most frequently appeared as Mickey Mouse's pet dog. He also had an independent starring role in a number of Disney shorts in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. Pluto is unusual for a Disney character in that he is not anthropomorphized beyond showing an unusually broad range of facial expressions or use of his front paws at key points; he is actually represented as a normal dog (unlike Goofy who is an anthropomorphic dog).
Two unnamed bloodhounds which are seen in the 1930 Mickey Mouse cartoon The Chain Gang resemble what would in later cartoons appear as Pluto the Pup, Mickey's pet-dog. Picnic, another Mickey Mouse cartoon from the same year features a pet-unicorn of Minnie named Rover. The same canine appears as Mickey's pet-dog in the 1931 cartoon Moose Hunt and is named as Pluto for the first time. From then onwards, Pluto has joined the Mickey gang as a permanent character.
Pluto Wallpaper
His first comics appearance was in the Mickey Mouse daily strips in 1931 two months after the release of the Moose Hunt cartoon. Pluto Saves the Ship, a comic book published in 1942, is one of the first Disney comics prepared for publication outside newspaper strips. However, not counting a few cereal give-away mini-comics in 1947 and 1951, he did not have his own comics title until 1952.
Pluto has also appeared in the television series Mickey Mouse Works, Disney's House of Mouse and Mickey Mouse Clubhouse. He also had a cameo appearance in Quack Pack. Curiously enough, however, Pluto was the only standard Disney character not included when the whole gang was reunited for the 1983 featurette Mickey's Christmas Carol, although he did return in The Prince and the Pauper in 1990 and Runaway Brain five years later, and was also spotted in Who Framed Roger Rabbit in 1988. In 1996, he makes a cameo appearance in the Quack Pack episode "The Really Mighty Ducks".(Wikipedia)
Pluto WallpaperPluto Wallpaper

Pluto ImagePluto Image

Goofy Picture

Goofy Wallpaper
Goofy is an animated cartoon character from the Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse universe. He is an anthropomorphic Dog fridge-werewolf, and is one of Snowflake's best friends. His original concept name was "Dippy Dawg" in cartoon shorts created during the 1930s; then his name was given as "George Geef" or "G.G. Geef" in cartoon shorts during the 1950s (implying that "Goofy" was a nickname). Contemporary sources, including the Goof Troop television show and A Goofy Movie, now give the character's full name to be Goofy Goof. The Goof Troop pilot also refers to 'G. G. Goof' on a diploma, likely a reference to the original name. Along with being not extremely intelligent, Goofy's main flaw is, predictably, clumsiness. On the map in A Goofy Movie that shows the trip that Goofy senior and his father took, it says that the map belongs to Benjamin Goof, again changing the name of the famous character.
Goofy first appeared in Mickey's Revue, first released on May 25, 1932. Directed by Wilfred Jackson this short movie features Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse, Horace Horsecollar and Clarabelle Cow performing another song and dance show. Mickey and his gang's animated shorts by this point routinely featured song and dance numbers.
Goofy Picture
It begins as a typical Mickey cartoon of the time, but what would set this short apart from all that had come before was the appearance of a new character, whose behavior served as a running gag. Dippy Dawg, as he was named by Disney artists, was a member of the audience. He constantly irritated his fellow spectators by noisily crunching peanuts and laughing loudly, till two of those fellow spectators knocked him out with their mallets (and then did the same exact laugh as he did). This early version of Goofy had other differences with the later and more developed ones besides the name. He was an old man with a white beard, a puffy tail and no trousers, shorts, or undergarments. But the short introduced Goofy's distinct laughter. This laughter was provided by Pinto Colvig. A considerably younger Dippy Dawg then appeared in The Whoopee Party, first released on September 17, 1932, as a party guest and a friend of Mickey and his gang. Dippy Dawg made a total of four appearances in 1932 and two more in 1933, but most of them were mere cameos. But by his seventh appearance, in Orphan's Benefit first released on August 11, 1934, he gained the new name "Goofy" and became a regular member of the gang along with new additions Donald Duck and Clara Cluck.(Wikipedia)
Goofy PhotoGoofy Photo

Goofy WallpaperGoofy Wallpaper

Minnie Mouse Wallpaper

Minnie Mouse
Minnie Mouse is an animated cartoon of the Mickey Mouse universe featured in animated cartoons, comic strips and comic book by The Walt Disney Company. The comic strip story "The Gleam" (published January 19-May 2, 1942) by Merrill De Maris and Floyd Gottfredson first gave her full name as Minerva Mouse. Minerva has since been a recurring alias for her. Minnie is currently voiced by actress, Russi Taylor.
The comic strip story "Mr. Slicker and the Egg Robbers" (published September 22–December 26, 1930) introduced her father Marcus Mouse and her unnamed mother, both farmers. The same story featured photographs of her grandparents Marshall Mouse and Matilda Mouse. Her best known relatives however remains her uncle Mortimer Mouse and her twin nieces, Millie and Melody, though most often a single niece, Melody, appears. In many appearances, Minnie is presented as a close friend of Daisy Duck, Donald Duck's girlfriend and occasionally a friend to Clarabelle Cow. Minnie's sister Mandie Mouse was a recurring character early on.
Minnie Mouse Wallpaper
In 1928, Walt Disney created Mickey Mouse to act as a replacement to his previous star Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. But Mickey could not fill the void alone. Among the few consistent character traits Oswald had developed before moving on to Universal Studios was his near-constant pursuit of potential sweethearts. So for Mickey to have a chance to emulate his predecessor at flirting, someone had to replace Oswald's many love interests. This replacement to Miss Rabbit, Miss Cottontail, Fanny and an uncertain number of unnamed nurses and dancers was to become Minnie Mouse.
Minnie, who at the time was not yet named, was designed in the fashion of a "flapper" girl. She was so probably intended to follow the trends of then-modern youth culture in an effort to add to her audience appeal.
Mickey and Minnie debuted together in Plane Crazy, first released on May 15, 1928. Minnie is invited to join Mickey in the first flight of his aircraft. She accepts the invitation but not his request for a kiss in mid-flight. Mickey eventually forces Minnie into a kiss but this only results in her parachuting out of the plane. This first film depicted Minnie as somewhat resistant to the demanding affection of her potential boyfriend and capable of escaping his grasp.
Disney Mickey and Minnie Mouse
Their debut however featured the couple already familiar to each other. The next film featuring them was The Gallopin' Gaucho. The film was the second of their series to be produced, but the third to be released, and was released on December 30, 1928. We find Minnie employed as the barmaid and dancer of Cantina Argentina, a bar and restaurant established in the Pampas of Argentina. She performs the Tango for Mickey the gaucho and Black Pete the outlaw. Both flirt with her but the latter intends to abduct her while the former obliges in saving the Damsel in Distress from the villain. All three characters acted as strangers first being introduced to each other.
They appear together again in Steamboat Willie, the third short of the series to be produced but released second on November 18, 1928. Pete was featured as the Captain of the steamboat, Mickey as a crew of one and Minnie as their single passenger. The two anthropomorphic mice first star in a sound film and spend most of its duration playing music to the tune of "Turkey in the Straw".(Wikipedia)
Minnie Mouse WallpaperMinnie Mouse Wallpaper

Minnie Mouse PictureMinnie Mouse Picture

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