Friday, March 6, 2009

The death of common sense


I got the idea for this cartoon from the article that follows:


London Times: Obituary of the late Common Sense
Published by Jonathan Farrington at 6:57 pm under General

Travelling in the UK these past few weeks has given me a much clearer indication of just how much social standards have deteriorated and just why I have become “a grumpy old man”
Every time I visit, I think to myself “I must leave these shores - and soon” and then, rather like awakening from a bad dream, I realise that I already have and being here is just a temporary inconvenience. You cannot imagine the relief.
Most of all, I have witnessed the death of “common sense”

Here is his obituary:

Today we mourn the passing of a beloved old friend, Common Sense, who has been with us for many years.

No one knows for sure how old he was, since his birth records were lost long ago in bureaucratic red tape. He will be remembered as having cultivated such valuable lessons as:Knowing when to come in out of the rain; why the early bird gets the worm; Life isn’t always fair; and maybe it was my fault. Common Sense lived by simple, sound financial policies (don’t spend more than you can earn) and reliable strategies (adults, not children, are in charge). His health began to deteriorate rapidly when well-intentioned but overbearing regulations were set in place.

Reports of a 6-year-old boy charged with sexual harassment for kissing a classmate; teens suspended from school for using mouthwash after lunch; and a teacher fired for reprimanding an unruly student, only worsened his condition.

Common Sense lost ground when parents attacked teachers for doing the job that they themselves had failed to do in disciplining their unruly children. It declined even further when schools were required to get parental consent to administer sun lotion or an Aspirin to a student; but could not inform parents when a student became pregnant and wanted to have an abortion.

Common Sense lost the will to live as the churches became businesses; and criminals received better treatment than their victims. Common Sense took a beating when you couldn’t defend yourself from a burglar in your own home and the burglar could sue you for assault. Common Sense finally gave up the will to live, after a woman failed to realize that a steaming cup of coffee was hot. She spilled a little in her lap, and was promptly awarded a huge settlement.

Common Sense was preceded in death by his parents, Truth and Trust; his wife, Discretion; his daughter, Responsibility; and his son, Reason.

He is survived by his four stepbrothers; I Know My Rights, I Want It Now, Someone Else Is To Blame, and I’m A Victim. Not many attended his funeral because so few realized he was gone.

(With gratitude for the collusion, to a fellow “grumpy old man” living down under - my very good friend and leadership guru, Kevin Dwyer)


Dora the Explorer Top Cartoon Family

Dora the Explorer
Dora the Explorer is an American animated television series that is carried on the Nickelodeon cable television network. A pilot episode for the series aired in 1999, and Dora the Explorer became a regular series in 2000. The show was created by Chris Gifford, Valerie Walsh, Rick Velleu and Eric Weiner. The series also airs on Noggin. The show aired on CBS until September 2006. A Spanish-dubbed version first aired as part of a Nick en espaƱol block on NBC Universal-owned Telemundo through September 2006; since April of 2008, this version of the program airs on Univision as part of the Planeta U block.

Dora the Explorer has been extremely successful, including $1 billion in sales in 2004 alone
In every episode, Dora goes on an exploring trip to find something or help somebody. Dora always asks the viewers at home to help her find new ways to get to the places with the help of Map. Dora also teaches children Spanish.

She sees everyone equally and mainly good no matter who the character, this noted at her not holding a grudge against Swiper for all the items he's swiped from her party. She acts against villains only when innocence sakes' depend on it and compromise is mostly impossible or unless she is somewhat strictly required to, but even still, she has yet to hold any true accounts of actual anger. Dora is very kind and will always give others a chance to try their hands at certain task for the simple thrill of seeing them excel in the skill even when/if she herself could have possibly fulfill the task faster and/or more accurately.

Though Dora spends very little time indoors, she still best values her family and its background and all who reside at her house. She seems to always want to influence her traditions and customs to those who have yet to know but still she is very subtle in doing so and wouldn't force her beliefs on others.

Dora openly loves her family. She loves Boots too. He is also her best friend since she saved his beloved red boots from being swiped by Swiper.

Dora enjoys sports. She was on a baseball team with her best friend Boots and her other friends and was coached by her father (his employment status was never changed after that). She loves soccer and is very good at it. Dora also speaks Spanish, teaching small words and phrases to the viewers.

Dora is also quite the musician shown mostly as having skill in playing the wooden flute.

The character was voiced by Kathleen Herles in every season, until she was replaced by Caitlin Sanchez

Early concepts of Dora had her as a blond girl of European ancestry. The character was originally based on one of the creator's (Rick Velleu) nieces named Lilli(wikipedia)
Dora the Explorer Top Cartoon FamilyDora the Explorer Top Cartoon Family

Dora the Explorer Cartoon from NickelodeonDora the Explorer Dora the Explorer Cartoon from Nickelodeon

Dora the Explorer CartoonsDora the Explorer Dora the Explorer Cartoons

Curious George Popular Children Cartoons

Curious George
Curious George is the protagonist of a series of popular children's books by the same name, written by Hans Augusto Rey and Margret Rey. The books feature a curious monkey named George, who is brought from his home in Africa by "The Man with The Yellow Hat" to live with him in a big city.

Around the world, the adventures of Curious George have been translated in many languages, and George takes on names such as "Peter Pedal" in Denmark, "Nysgjerrige Nils" in Norway, "Nicke Nyfiken" in Sweden, "Hitomane Kozaru" in Japan, "George Ha'Sakran" in Israel and "Jorge el Curioso" in Spanish speaking countries. In the United Kingdom, George was originally called "Zozo", apparently to avoid using the name of the then king George VI for a monkey.

In each of the books, Curious George is identified in the text as a monkey, though in the illustrations he does not correspond exactly to any non-fictional species of monkey (and has more of the characteristics of an ape, especially a chimpanzee). (wikipedia)
Curious George Popular Children CartoonsCurious George Popular Children Cartoons

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Curious George WallpaperCurious George Wallpaper

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